[Being] a little off in the fit is not all bad. Each and every one of us has quirks, and is a little ‘funny’ anyway, one way or another. Nobody’s perfect, and those who think they are, or try to look that way, look like mannequins. Stiff. Clothes that look too engineered lack a sense of style, as do people who look too engineered. Look comfortable; be comfortable. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Life’s too important to worry about inconsequential details.
David Mercer, upon me asking if he could make me a custom shirt that’s slimmer fitting than what he offers ready-to-wear (via putthison)
The Kirifuri Waterfall on Mount Kurakami in Shimotsuke Province, Katsushika Hokusai / 葛飾 北斎. Japanese (1760 - 1849)

The Kirifuri Waterfall on Mount Kurakami in Shimotsuke Province, Katsushika Hokusai / 葛飾 北斎. Japanese (1760 - 1849)

(Source: poboh, via andrewmicah)

natgeofound:

President and Mrs. Johnson and Vice President Agnew watch Apollo 11 lift off at Cape Canaveral, July 1969.Photograph by Otis Imboden, National Geographic

natgeofound:

President and Mrs. Johnson and Vice President Agnew watch Apollo 11 lift off at Cape Canaveral, July 1969.Photograph by Otis Imboden, National Geographic

onism

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the frustration of being stuck in just one body, that inhabits only one place at a time, which is like standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange place names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die—and all because, as the arrow on the map helpfully points out, you are here.

I am learning every day to allow the space between where I am and where I want to be to inspire me and not terrify me.
Tracee Ellis Ross 

(Source: streetetiquette, via andrewmicah)

A gente se abraçou, em despedida, e eu me agarrei nas ruas roupas. Foi um abraço demorado, talvez o mais. Eu nunca tinha sentido um medo tão grande de me soltar. Não só porque você ia ir embora, mas porque eu sabia que uma parte de mim iria junto. Você é uma parte de mim.

Eu te dei uma carona e, pela primeira vez em meses nas ruas do bairro, eu não tive pressa. Dirigi devagar, evitando dar a seta. O tique-taque parecia um relógio que contava os minutos até a última vez em que eu te deixaria em casa. Depois, nada seria como antes.

Você disse aquelas coisas porque sabia que me magoariam. Mas você me beijou porque sabia que me acalmaria. Se a gente desaprendeu a amar, sempre é tempo para ensinarmos um ao outro. Não existem planos, diagnósticos ou certezas para quem se ama.

Eu só sei de uma coisa. Ou melhor, não sei. Eu não sei viver sem você.

“Unfortunately, the people who are supposed to love us aren’t always able to give us the kind of love we need. Whether they are our mothers or our fathers, our grandparents or our siblings, some family, no matter how good their intentions, leave us feeling empty, invalidated, uncared for, and alone. And on the days when that pain becomes too much to bear, our work is to recognize that those people whose love we so desperately pine for are never going to be able to meet our needs. Not because they don’t care, but because they can’t change who they are. Their scant affection isn’t a reflection on our worth. It isn’t even about us. It’s about them and their own limitations and struggles. It’s about their unique way of expressing love and the fact that it doesn’t match up with our own. And we don’t have to internalize that. What we need is to start reaching out to the right people. We need to create a family of people outside of our family. People who can meet our needs and reciprocate our love. We need to appreciate our families for the ways in which they are able to show they care, and be accepting of the ways they can’t. We need to make peace with who they are and if necessary, we need to give ourselves permission to let go. We need to know that our worth isn’t something another person’s love can give or take away. We need to trust that with or without their affection, we are enough.”

— Daniell Koepke

(Source: internal-acceptance-movement, via andrewmicah)

When your parents tell you that they don’t understand you, loosen your fists. When the boy two rows over and four chairs back whispers something to the girl beside him, relax your jaw. When you find yourself packing up some clothes, a toothbrush and a pen, stretch your legs. When the girl in the library nursing a coffee with two sugars no cream makes eyes at you, calm your heart. Take it for a walk. Remind yourself that people will always be a boundary, a constant, a something you have to deal with, and it’s not learning how to fight through them. It’s learning to step around and past them. I’ve been meaning to tell you, to write you, to sing to you, to bring you the moon on a silver platter with no fork, no knife, no spoon. Dig in. Eat with your hands. Let her dust powder your chin. The caterpillar says, Today I will eat. I will eat until I am full. The butterfly that emerges from the cocoon retains nothing from their previous life as a leaf-eater, except that his favorite color is green.
Kristina H., “Metamorphosis”

(Source: fleurishes, via andrewmicah)